Tuesday, 31 July 2012

Don't give up

A while ago a friend of mine shared a video and I thought I'd share it with you guys. It is not about Lymphedema as such but about not giving up. It is about a man who thought he'd never walk on his own again. Everyone had given up, exept one. Some Lymphedema patients find themselves in the same situation. As some of the comments to my previous posts proves, due to so many doctors being so ignorant of Lymphedema, so many Lymphedema sufferes around the world are wrongly – if ever – diagnosed and ends up in desperate situations. Huge limbs out of control. Amputated limbs. Wheelchair bound. Pain.

See the video here.

A song comes to mind. The beautyful "Don't give up" with Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush. I never paid much attention to the lyrics and assumed it was about love but a couple of years ago I learnt that it is about unemployment. However, I find that many of the phrases in this song are valid for other aspects of life, including life with a serious ilness.

As only one of the three winners of the give-away contacted me with their address I have now picked two others instead of the no-shows. Christina and Hutch, please send me your addresses and I will make sure the books get to you. Yay – congratulations!

10 comments:

  1. Nice video.

    Perspective is important, too. I've been going through some tests and health scares that make the lymphedema seem small - and the stress of this has given me stomach problems that mean I have to eat very limited food, perhaps for as long as a month. I would die of gratitude at this point for a plate of spaghetti with tomato sauce. There are still a lot of pleasures in life that the lymphedema doesn't make impossible - and as the illness of my partner's father reminds me too, we're still alive. That makes ANYTHING possible!

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    1. Hi Elaine.
      You are so right about perspectives. Compared to being perfectly healthy Lymphedema is a big thing but compared to life threatening ilnesses it is not so big. It used to make me really angry when people said to me "at least it is not cancer" or "it could have been much worse", because I didn't feel it was fair comparing my newly obtained condition to those things when I didn't have them - I was perfectly healthy. It is still true though.
      I am sorry you have been going through these scares and I hope you are OK.

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    2. One difference that's annoying about the lymphedema is that it's with us ALWAYS. (Well, maybe somebody will find a great surgery but until then....:)) Cancer is awful and can threaten your life but some cancer is pretty nearly 100 percent curable. I had some bad moments of jealousy of a friend with mild breast cancer earlier this year - how could I be jealous of somebody with cancer? Because while she is going through utter hell right now she will be RID OF IT in three months. She can walk barefoot on beaches etc etc etc. I think what's hard about lymphedema is that it's chronic and that it's so unknown. That's why this blog is so great.

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    3. Hi Elaine. Yes, the fact that we don't know how our situation will progress sure can be frustrating. Will it suddenly go beserk or will it get better...
      So true about it always. Imagine if we could have a moment of magic - being Lymphedemafree for just ten minutes...

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  2. Very encouraging blog. At every turn I'm finding unexpected reminders that "things could always be worse" and messages of hope to not give up (or not give in, as the case may be, to bad attitudes and wrong perspectives. Things aren't always what they seem.).

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    1. Thanks, Christina.
      Yes, things can almost always be worse, and they can almost always get better. Attitude, perspective, motivation and encouragement/help from others are keywords, I guess. Your mum is so lucky to have you :-)

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  3. I have just discovered your blog and I am so grateful for it! Thank you so much for creating this and for posting such helpful information, particularly about clothes and shoes. I am a reader in the United States, in my mid-30s and have had lymphedema in one leg since my late 20s. (There's no family history of lymphedema; I noticed the swelling in one leg while training for a race and running on the treadmill at the gym in front of a mirror.) Summer time is one of the worst times for me as I am more conscious of all that I can't wear. So, I am especially thankful to find a blog that reflects understanding of so much of what I have experienced, and that is so informative. Thank you!

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  4. Hi there, welcome to my blog :-) Thank you so much for your kind words. It sure is a hassle to learn to live with this, especially finding clothes and shoes. I am glad you can use my tips. It means a lot to me that you can relate to my experiences, it gives me a feeling of not being alone with the thoughts and emotions that comes with this mysterious and akward condition.
    Thanks for reading my blog :-)

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  5. Thank you for your blog, so much great ideas and hope you put in this :)

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    1. Hi Clara, thank you so much for your sweet words, and thanks for reading my blog :-)

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